Layers of Wire Mesh

Using a process that could be the new definition of meticulous, Korean sculptor Seung Mo Park creates giant ephemeral portraits by cutting layer after layer of wire mesh. Each work begins with a photograph which is superimposed over layers of wire with a projector, then using a subtractive technique Park slowly snips away areas of mesh.

Layers of Wire Mesh. Originally published on Scouting the World

Layers of Wire Mesh

Using a process that could be the new definition of meticulous, Korean sculptor Seung Mo Park creates giant ephemeral portraits by cutting layer after layer of wire mesh. Each work begins with a photograph which is superimposed over layers of wire with a projector, then using a subtractive technique Park slowly snips away areas of mesh.

Layers of Wire Mesh. Originally published on Scouting the World

Unlikely: The Impossible and Improbable Objects of Giuseppe Colarusso

In this ongoing series titled Unlikely, artist and photographer Giuseppe Colarusso imagines bizarre and humorous objects, each of which is either technically impossible, improbable, or simply useless in its proposed design. Colarusso tells me via email that many of the pieces he fabricates himself, however some are digitally created in Photoshop. So what’s the point? He hopes each image will make you stop, think and hopefully bring a smile to your face, which is definitely a worthy cause. Also, I would pay top dollar for that spray paint can with adjustable hue sliders, so could somebody make that? See some 50+ additional concepts over on his website.

The Mancunian Apocalypse

Now many smug southerners will tell you that once you go north of Oxford, the rest of the country looks like an apocalyptic wasteland. They’re wrong, obviously, but this collection of incredibly life-like paintings might seem more like photographs to many of them. Artist James Chadderton has created an eerie vision of Manchester in the future where humans are nowhere to be seen. All that remains is a broken city.