Lars Poeck fotografiert verlassene und unbekannte Orte in Berlin


“Berlin weigerte sich, die unchristlich zu Tode Gekommenen auf den öffentlichen Friedhöfen zu begraben. Doch wohin mit den angespülten Leichen unweit des Havelknicks? Diese Aufgabe lag beim Revierförster des Grunewalds. So entstand damals der Selbstmörderfriedhof.”

Quelle: Lars Poeck fotografiert verlassene und unbekannte Orte in Berlin – Mit Vergnügen Berlin

Lars Poeck fotografiert verlassene und unbekannte Orte in Berlin. Originally published on Scouting the World

Infinity Pool

The vertiginous \”infinity pool\” at the Marina Bay Sands resort offers a sweeping view of Singapore, a country that\’s achieved success while building up instead of out.

Whimsical Illustrations Merge with Everyday Objects

Instagram continues to pave the way for innovative artists like graphic designer Javier Pérez, who regularly adds to his playful series entitled Instagram Experiments. Using a variety of everyday objects combined with simple line drawings, the Ecuador-based artist constructs whimsical scenes in all shapes and sizes.

Life’s too short for the wrong job

Jobisintown.de is a German online recruitment website. They have made these amazing advertisements with the slogan “Life’s too short for the wrong job”. Over the years they have come up with several other print adverts that have the same idea of real person operating the machine. This campaign has won many awards.

Don Hong-Oai

In 1979, a bloody border war started between Vietnam and the People’s Republic of China, and following a series of repressive policies that targeted Chinese immigrants, Dong Hong-Oai became one of the millions of “boat people”who left Vietnam during the 70s and 80s. At the age of 50, speaking no English and knowing no one in America, the artist arrived in San Francisco and was even able to set up a small darkroom.

Don Hong-Oai. Originally published on Scouting the World

Don Hong-Oai

In 1979, a bloody border war started between Vietnam and the People’s Republic of China, and following a series of repressive policies that targeted Chinese immigrants, Dong Hong-Oai became one of the millions of “boat people”who left Vietnam during the 70s and 80s. At the age of 50, speaking no English and knowing no one in America, the artist arrived in San Francisco and was even able to set up a small darkroom.